Rage and Mercy Part 1

Rage and Mercy Part 1

Rage and Mercy Part 1

by Scott Dresden

Review by Barry Boy

I was given Rage and Mercy Part 1 by Scott Dresden in exchange for an honest review while it was OnlineBookClub.org Book of the Day.

Rage and Mercy Part 1 is a psychological murder-mystery, or perhaps a psychological revenge murder-mystery written in the third person and set mainly in Los Angeles, but also in other parts of the world. The story opens in east downtown Los Angeles with the brutal murder, including decapitation, of a fleeing drug fiend.

The murderer’s name is Seyer and he is also the main protagonist in the story. We learn that an important person in Seyer’s life, although they were in no way romantically connected, was senselessly murdered and then her dead body abused by drug addicts high on something or other.

The woman’s father was distraught naturally enough, but the girl was already the last surviving female in his family. Seyer, a veteran of several US army campaigns, agrees to help avenge the man’s loss.

However, this has other consequences, which are difficult to predict. It is reminiscent of Eli Roth’s ‘Death Wish‘ and Martin Scorsese’s ‘Taxi Driver‘.

Rage and Mercy Part 1 contains a lot of psychological reasoning, which the reader hears through the thoughts of the characters, although, as always, you don’t have to agree with with the conclusions the characters draw, but it is interesting to read why they do the things they do.

Rage and Mercy Part 1 is my kind of book purely because the psychological reasoning of the characters is made evident. I don’t usually care what the book’s characters do, but I do care why they did what they did.

The book’s cover and its title are not immediately obvious, but they are relevant. The contents have also been well edited, if probably not professionally so.

All in all, I enjoyed Rage and Mercy Part 1 very much and recommend it to all readers of the styles I mentioned above.

If you would like to learn more about Rage and Mercy Part 1 by Scott Dresden, please click the following link:

http://forums.onlinebookclub.org/shelves/book.php?id=153473