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Your Computer: The Spy You Trust

Your Computer: The Spy You Trust

Your Computer: The Spy You Trust

We all have some sort of computer these days, don’t we? If you don’t have a desktop computer, you may have a laptop, and if not those then a tablet or smartphone. If you don’t have any of those, perhaps you have a new smart TV or fridge or burglar alarm, which uses the Internet to transfer its signal to you. They can all be used to spy on you.

Let’s call all these Internet-enabled devices ‘smart’, because the Internet is the only difference between a phone and a smartphone, a TV and a smart TV, etc. All these smart devices can be hacked – I’m sure that you are aware of that, and if they can be hacked, they can be used to spy on you.

Now think about this. If ne’er-do-wells can take control of your device, what if the manufacturers left easy access to them for the government or the police to watch what you were doing – in essence spy on you?

These entry points are commonly referred to as ‘back-doors’.

If this is true, then the government or police can probably use your trusted computer devices to spy on you by remote control. They would be able to listen in on conversations, take pictures and even use the device’s geolocation capability to track where you are and so, also where you go.

In this way, the computer devices that we have all come to rely so heavily upon can be used far more effectively than even the most experienced secret agent. Not only that, but whereas secret agents (and even just police officers in general) are extremely costly to train, almost anyone can listen in on a conversation or watch a video and record it if it sounds as if their boss might be interested in it.

Think about the ramifications of the above.

The trusted computer, Internet, and smart devices could become – or already be – our jailers!

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All the best,

Owen

Podcast: Your Computer: The Spy You Trust